Obtain Proper Low Voltage in RTU by Proper Connecting of Low Voltage Transformer Primary Side

As an Omaha heating & cooling contractor, we work on roof top units (RTUs) which are common units that provide heating and cooling for commercial applications in the Omaha metro area. Sometimes we find the low voltage circuit of an operating roof top HVAC unit with lower than normal voltage. This blog is about establishing proper low voltage in RTU. Give us a call at 402-238-2425 for all your HVAC needs.

Omaha Trane Comfort Specialist shows how to Properly Connect The Primary Side Of A Low Voltage Transformer On Roof Top HVAC UnitsAccurate Heating & Cooling Is A Trane Comfort SpecialistAccurate Heating & Cooling has BBB A+ Rating

The photo below is of a typical Trane Roof Top Unit.

 Trane commercial building HVAC repair and replacement in Omaha

Many manufacturers ship new roof top HVAC units with a low voltage transformer that can be connected to either 208V or 230V primary voltage, depending on the line voltage at the installation site.

Photo of Low Voltage Transformer Used in Commercial Roof Top Unit to Supply Low Voltage Circuit

Proper Low Voltage in RTU by Proper Connecting of Low Voltage Transformer Primary Side

The image above is of a low voltage transformer installed in a roof top unit. The red and blue wires connected to the spade terminals at the top of the transformer in the photo above are for connecting the secondary winding of the low voltage transformer to the secondary circuit. These two wires (with bare metal connectors) connect the circuit board (low voltage circuit) to the low voltage transformer.

The larger red and blue wires with the blue plastic connectors that are connected to the spade terminals at the bottom of the transformer connect to the transformer’s primary winding. The red wire is connected to the spade terminal on the left where the sticker indicates this terminal is the “C” terminal. The C terminal is the common terminal. The blue wire is shown connected to the 230V terminal. There is a third terminal between the C terminal and the 230V terminal. This middle terminal, which has nothing connected to it in this photo, is labeled as 208V.

For more technical information on Tyco Electronics low voltage transformers, refer to the TE website.

Check Line Voltage Supplying Transformer

Confirm the actual line voltage at the installation site by measuring voltage using a digital multimeter (DMM).

DMM determines line voltage as 208V or 240V to ensure proper low voltage in RTU

In the image above for example, the voltage between two of the incoming leads to the main contactor reads 210V. A similar voltage was obtain between L1 and L2, between L2 and L3, and between L3 and L1. This means that the voltage to the unit is considered 208V. Note that voltage will vary slightly at different points along the electrical grid. At this particular commercial location, the actual line voltage reads a little higher voltage than the nominal voltage of 208V and this is not uncommon.

Safety First

WARNING: These repair activities involve working on high voltage equipment that poses serious electrical shock risk. Follow all safe electrical work practices and ensure that only qualified, trained service technicians perform these repair activities. Hazardous Voltage! Failure to disconnect power before servicing could result in death or serious injury. Disconnect all electric power, including remote disconnects, before servicing. Follow proper lockout/tagout procedures to ensure the power cannot be inadvertently energized.

Attach the primary wires going to the low voltage transformer to the appropriate primary side spade terminals.

  • For example, if actual measured line voltage of the circuit is 210V, then connect one primary side lead going to the low voltage transformer to the 208V spade terminal. There will be no wire connected to the 230V spade terminal.
  • If the actual measured line voltage of the circuit is 233V, then connect one primary side lead going to the low voltage transformer to the 230V spade terminal. There will be no wire connected to the 208V spade terminal.
  • In either case, the common wire going to the low voltage transformer will connect to the C terminal (for common) of the low voltage transformer.
  • This will ensure proper low voltage for the RTU.

 

Lower than Expected Proper Low Voltage in Commercial Building RTU

If a low voltage circuit in a roof top unit is found with lower than expected voltage, say a reading of 23.6V, then ensure that the correct primary terminal is being used on the low voltage transformer. If the actual primary voltage, for example, is found to be 210V but the primary lead to the low voltage transformer is found to be connected to the 230V primary spade terminal, then the low voltage transformer primary side is not hooked up correctly.

DMM to determine proper low voltage in RTU

The photo above shows actual voltage on the low voltage circuit to be 23.6V. This voltage measurement is taken across both of the low voltage terminals of the low voltage transformer.

First Turn Off the Disconnect

To resolve the issue, shut off power to the unit by turning the disconnect off, and then remove the primary wire from the 230V spade terminal and connect this primary wire to the 208V spade terminal. Then turn the disconnect back on and measure secondary side voltage, expecting to find a higher voltage reading of say 26.2V.

DMM to determine if proper secondary voltage in Omaha RTU maintenance

The photo above shows actual voltage on the low voltage circuit to be 26.2V. This voltage measurement is taken across both of the low voltage terminals of the low voltage transformer.

In this case, utilizing the correct primary winding of the low voltage transformer raised the voltage of the low voltage circuit to a level (26.2V) that is more typical. This will ensure the proper low voltage to the RTU.

Other Reasons for Lower Than Expected Voltage

There are other reasons why the low voltage circuit may read lower voltage than what is typically found. One possible reason for lower than expected low voltage circuit voltage could be having more loads in the low voltage circuit than what the low voltage transformer can power.

Another reason for lower than expected low voltage circuit voltage could be a loose connection where the leads connect to the low voltage transformer or to the circuit board. There could also be corrosion at electrical connection points.

There could also be a short to ground that is bleeding off some voltage from the circuit. The short to ground would have to be very minor as a short normally would blow the fuse in the low voltage circuit.

While it is very rare, it sometimes happens that a low voltage transformer fails. Normally when this happens, it is the failure of some other component in the circuit that causes the low voltage transformer to fail. This will also help to ensure proper low voltage to the RTU.

Video on Low Voltage Transformers

The great video below explains more about low voltage transformers used in the HVAC industry.

Other Information

Check out our Home Page here to learn more about us.

And take a look at this blog for a list of maintenance items that homeowners can perform to keep their HVAC systems running efficiently.

For helpful hints when troubleshooting a failed gas valve in either a residential furnace or a commercial building roof top unit, refer to the blog for troubleshooting a failed gas valve. Once in a while we run across a RTU that uses electric heat instead of gas furnace heating. Check out this blog for an example of a York Electric Heat RTU. And check out this blog on how to troubleshoot a RTU Gas Regulator Intermittent Failure.

There is also a blog for helping to decode the complicated meaning behind the Trane roof top unit model number. Similarly, there is also a blog to help troubleshoot the model numbers for a Trane residential furnace. For a description of Armstrong furnace model numbers, refer to this blog.

For a description of what the MERV rating on air filters means, refer to this blog.

For a good discussion on what air filter would be best, refer to this blog.

For a description on how to control a furnace second stage heat using a time delay relay, refer to this blog.

As a trusted Omaha furnace repair and a/c repair contractor, call Accurate Heating & Cooling for all your Omaha furnace service, Omaha air conditioner service, Omaha commercial roof top unit service, Omaha mini split service, Omaha geothermal unit service, and Omaha home comfort needs. We also professionally install hvac equipment. We are licensed, bonded, insured, and experienced. Call us today at 402-238-2425.

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